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imminentlyginger:

you fucked up

I CAN’T STOP LAUGHING IT HURTS

(Source: becca-morley, via youcancallmequeenbun)

Tags: lolol
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Tags: chelsea
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thegayteen:

somewhereoverthebarricade:

Before I had tumblr I had no idea there were any sexualities other than heterosexual and homosexual. I never considered gender inequalities still existed.

That doesn’t mean I was purposely trying to discriminate or upset people.

There is a difference between being just ignorant of something and purposefully discriminating.

Give someone a chance to learn and be enlightened before you slam them as rude, horrible people

god bless

(via youcancallmequeenbun)

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theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.
But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.
Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.
In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.
Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.

But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.

Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.

In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.

Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

(via disneyforprincesses)

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crayonfullofcolour:

spooky-ashtonium:

kittykatgorawr:

augustusfring:

ifreakinlovebooks:

hypable:

A key part of a book to film adaptation is just how loyal the script is to the source material.
For The Fault in Our Stars, it’s nearly identical.
Read interview highlights at Hypable.com

YESSSSSS!

“But, you know, my hope is that it can be a good movie, not that it can be a good visualization of a book.”
he gets it

"HUMP THE MOIST CAVE WALL"

"MAKE SWEET LOVE TO THE CAVE WALL"

I AM SO EXCITEDDDDDDDDDDDD
and scared
not okay

crayonfullofcolour:

spooky-ashtonium:

kittykatgorawr:

augustusfring:

ifreakinlovebooks:

hypable:

A key part of a book to film adaptation is just how loyal the script is to the source material.

For The Fault in Our Stars, it’s nearly identical.

Read interview highlights at Hypable.com

YESSSSSS!

“But, you know, my hope is that it can be a good movie, not that it can be a good visualization of a book.”

he gets it

"HUMP THE MOIST CAVE WALL"

"MAKE SWEET LOVE TO THE CAVE WALL"

I AM SO EXCITEDDDDDDDDDDDD

and scared

not okay

Text

heatmor:

why does anyone even care about other people doing things that have no negative outcome? like let girls take selfies with starbucks!! let straight dudes wear weird clothes!! let gay people be as feminine or as masculine as they want!! the next time you find yourself getting annoyed at someone, ask yourself “is this disrespectful? is this harmful to me or anyone else?” if the answer is no, then let it go - you probably have bigger things to worry about anyways

(via crayonfullofcolour)

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youmewenow:

it’s okay to be in a long-term relationship and not get a rush every time you kiss or hold hands or whatever. the body cannot physiologically sustain the heightened level of cortisol, adrenaline, and everything else fight-or-flight that you feel in the infatuation phase. i mean, don’t stay with someone who doesn’t make you happy, but don’t assume something’s wrong with your relationship because tumblr says you have to feel fireworks every day for the rest of your life.

(via jstaki)

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colourfulpantsandarainbowhat:

WHY DO PEOPLE CALL IT FUCK, MARRY, KILL WHEN THEY COULD CALL IT BED, WED, BEHEAD

(Source: felixdawkins23, via asweregrowingolder)

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terrakion:

policymic:

Dreamworks is doing something even Pixar hasn’t tried: A black female heroine

DreamWorks Animation Studios has announced the addition of a black female heroine (gasp!) to its repertoire of white dogs, green ogres, snails, Neanderthals, pandas, white people and Antz. In doing so, it joins an elite club consisting of … well, nobody.
Not one major Hollywood studio has released a 3D animated feature starring a black character.
Read more | Follow policymic


SHES VOICED BY RIHANNA

terrakion:

policymic:

Dreamworks is doing something even Pixar hasn’t tried: A black female heroine

DreamWorks Animation Studios has announced the addition of a black female heroine (gasp!) to its repertoire of white dogs, green ogres, snails, Neanderthals, pandas, white people and Antz. In doing so, it joins an elite club consisting of … well, nobody.

Not one major Hollywood studio has released a 3D animated feature starring a black character.

Read more | Follow policymic

SHES VOICED BY RIHANNA

(via disneyforprincesses)

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disneybakerdcp:

A) I LOVE SCHNAUZERS
B) THIS IS ONE OF THE GREATEST THINGS I’VE EVER SEEN

disneybakerdcp:

A) I LOVE SCHNAUZERS

B) THIS IS ONE OF THE GREATEST THINGS I’VE EVER SEEN

(via youcancallmequeenbun)

Tags: brittany